Adjust font size:
        

Site Search

The Hunger Project Bolen Report
Ohm Society
Untitled

Questions for Dr. Kennedy
Welcome to Ask Dr. Kennedy. We encourage you to post your comments and questions here. We look forward to challenging questions as they are an education for us as well as for you. Please consider the following guidelines when posting:

Ask Dr. Kennedy is an educational service. Any medical advice on which you act should come directly from your personal physician.
Mention of any commercial products for sale will be removed.
Do not enter your title or message in ALL CAPS. If you do so, it will be removed.
Take care for your spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.
 
Multi-faceted Problem
Posted by: Peter
Date: May 19, 2005 9:26 PM

I was a chronic marijuana smoker for years. I quit in the beginning of December. I went through a three week period of hellish withdrawal. The withdrawal symptoms dissipated and I was feeling great for 2 weeks. I have also been chewing nicotine gum for years. I got hooked on it while quitting smoking. After my two weeks of feeling great my health has greatly deteriorated. My doctor said I was depressed from not having the "weed barrier and prescribed me Lexapro. I wish I never touched that pill, I had a horrible reaction to the medication, he insisted it would work in a month, It didn't, I terminated the Lexapro and have been trying to get to the bottom of my issues. I am a 33 yr old male. I own a successful business which I can barely run these days. My symptoms which get more lengthy as time goes on, are tremendous fatigue, inability to sleep through the night brain fog, constant obsessive thoughts, inability to handle stress, prostatitis, tonsillitis, muscle weakness, bad constipation, gas, etc. Abnormal tests reveal low testosterone and also I have thyroid autoantibodies. I am afraid I am on my way to developing CFS. I was bench pressing 300 lbs. in November, now a walk on the treadmill destroys me. I had 3 amalgams removed in March because of new cavities under the amalgams. I have been to numerous doctors who can tell me nothing. My latest doc told me it could be my chewing nicotine gum with my amalgams and the removal with no protocol. (my symptoms have gotten 100 x worse since their removal). He gave me a DMSA challenge test to take, which I am scared to take because of my sensitivities and a fecal test for yeast and parasites. I can't take this anymore. I have lost 30 lbs. I have had every test in the book, no cancer, no bacterial infections. I am getting more and more sensitive to the environment, even vitamins have the ability to make me loopy. I live in NYC and that is a problem here as you could imagine. Can you make sense of this? I only had 3 amalgams. Could it be the mercury? You mention the DMPS test as being the only accurate test. Any thoughts and help would be greatly appreciated.

RE: Multi-faceted Problem
Posted by: Ron Kennedy, M.D.
Date: May 20, 2005 12:58 AM

While the marijuana withdrawal may have been hellish, and MJ use may have helped set the stage for what is going on now, it is surely not part of the problem you are now experiencing. While I can't be more specific until I can do an in-person evaluation, in general terms it seems almost certain that you are dealing with a problem of toxicity (metals and/or organic toxins) complicated by a chronic infection. From what you say about your digestive functions it would seem very likely that at least one location of chronic infection is in your gut wall, while the presence of cavitations is also a frequent location of chronic infection. If all this is so, first it is a matter of finding a doc who can make the diagnosis - but that is not enough. That doc needs to be so clear about where you are in this mess that he/she can then lead you out and of course that doc needs to know the way out. Detoxification and treatment of chronic infection should be a specialty unto itself, and yet it is not, so many people are lost in their illness with no help in sight. I wish I could tell you of someone in the NYC are even East Coast area who has his or her mind wrapped about this problem (and they probably exist), but I have no way of knowing who they are. If you want to come to California, I will be glad to help you. We might be able to get off with just one visit, but understand the course of treatment might take several months or even the better part of a year depending on what we have to do to get you well.

RE: Multi-faceted Problem
Posted by: Peter
Date: May 20, 2005 1:07 PM

Is my doctors course of action wrong? Will the DMSA challenge test put me in danger? I am terrified of taking a pill, let alone 9. How would I go about coming out there to see you? What tests would you do? Everything I do seems to be in vain. I hate to go all the way to California for nothing.

RE: Multi-faceted Problem
Posted by: Ron Kennedy, M.D.
Date: May 20, 2005 3:17 PM

Oral DMSA is not particularly dangerous, although it relies on absorption to be useful and in many people with histories like yours, absorption is not the best. I prefer IV DMPS as that bypasses the digestive system and gives an absolutely accurate reading. Of course it is all useless until the dental amalgam has been removed as the very presence of amalgam in the teeth will give a big elevation in mercury on the test. Coming to see me means giving me a range of times when you can come so that I can offer you an appointment, then booking the flight and doing it. As to the tests, well as I said, the diagnosis of gut wall infection is not so hard and is easily made by history, but I confirm it with physical exam and microscopy. The real trick is in treating it successfully and that is where American medicine falls flat on its face. The Germans have been on top of this problem for 35 years and we now have availability (as of 2000) to their remedies. Nevertheless, American docs are very slow to catch onto concepts which are literally foreign.



This Thread has been closed

 




health healing information, physician medical library medical informaion, health, healing, advertising
(1154 words)