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Questions for Dr. Kennedy
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Hypothryoid symptoms with a normal tsh
Posted by: Elizabeth
Date: January 13, 2005 6:15 PM

I am 38 years old and been having hypothyrroid symptoms for approx 4 months. The last 3 months have been particularly difficult. Since my TSH was normal, my doctor feels that whatever I have will just go away. I have swelling, sometimes severe, in my hands, face and feet. Some days are better than others as far as fatigue goes, as well as the pain in my joints. Is it still possible to have a thyroid problem with a normal TSH level? (It's 1.71) My c-reactive protein was also extremely high but my doctor thinks that was accidental. Someone suggested it may be chronic fatigue syndrome but I thought there was no swelling associated with that?

RE: Hypothryoid symptoms with a normal tsh
Posted by: Ron Kennedy, M.D.
Date: January 14, 2005 5:51 AM

I presume you are hypometabolic, although you have not given me enough data to determine that. If your temperature is consistently low that would nail down that diagnosis. Hypothyroidism is one possible cause of hypometabolism, but is not the most common cause. The most common causes are mercury overload and chronic infection. If your C-reactive protein is elevated, that would indicate an infection, although there is no law against also being mercury toxic. If you are not aware of an infection, the most common sources of hidden chronic infection are gut wall and jaw (cavitations). There are articles on both of these subjects in this website under Library Articles. A fast way to find them is to use Search This Site in the upper left corner.



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