Floppy Valve Syndrome (Mitral Prolapse)

Floppy Valve Syndrome (Mitral Prolapse)

Dr. Kennedy
An abnormal bulging of part of the mitral valve’s cusps ackward into the atrium during the contraction of the heart. The strands of tissue (cordae tendini) which are designed by nature to prevent prolapse are not always perfectly made. If one or more are longer than optimal, this permits a partial prolapse with backflow of blood (regurgitation). Mitral valve prolapse is often an asymptomatic condition but when there is actual regurgitation, there can be symptoms (e.g. chest pain, fatigue, dizziness, dyspnea, or palpitations) with a tendency in some cases to endocarditis or ventricular tachycardia. Also known as Barlow’s syndrome, MVP syndrome, and systolic click–murmur syndrome. The diagnosis is made by ultrasound. Before todays refined imaging techniques many cases of minimum mitral valve prolapse with regurgitation were diagnosed as “benign murmurs.”

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