Chemobrain (Chemo-brain, Chemo-fog, Chemotherapy-related Cognitive Dysfunction)

Chemobrain (Chemo-brain, Chemo-fog, Chemotherapy-related Cognitive Dysfunction)

Dr. Kennedy
Chemobrain: Cognitive dysfunction associated with chemotherapy. It is thought that chemotherapy may cause memory loss, attention loss, and other problems that make it difficult for patients to think clearly. Also know as Chemo-brain, Chemo-fog, and Chemotherapy-related Cognitive Dysfunction. About 20 percent to 30 percent of people undergoing chemotherapy will experience cognitive impairment, though some studies report that at least half the participants had memory problems. Chemotherapy can affect cognitive abilities in the following ways:

  • Word finding. Difficulty reaching for the right word in conversation.
  • Memory. S-term memory lapses, such as not remembering where you put your keys or what you were supposed to buy at the store.
  • Multitasking. Difficulty performing multiple tasks at once.
  • Learning. Longer to learn new things. It may require reading a paragraph over a few times before getting the meaning.
  • Processing speed. It might take longer to do tasks that were once quick and easy.

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