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Benign Prostate Hypertrophy (BPH) (Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy) (Nodular Hyperplasia of the Prostate) Print E-mail

Dr. Kennedy Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a noncancerous prostate problem in which the normal elements of the prostate gland grow in size and number. Their sheer bulk may compress the urethra, which courses through the center of the prostate, impeding the flow of urine from the bladder through the urethra to the outside. This leads to urine retention and the need for frequent urination. If BPH is severe, complete blockage can occur. BPH generally begins in a man's 30s, evolves slowly, and causes symptoms only after age 50. BPH is very common. Half of men over age 50 develop symptoms of PBH, but only 10% need medical or surgical intervention. Watchful waiting with annual medical monitoring is appropriate for most men with BPH. Medical therapy includes drugs such as finasteride (Proscar) and terazosin (Hytrin). Nutritional therapy is more effective. The active nutritionals are zinc, copper, flaxseed, sunflower, or safflower oil, vitamin E, Seronoa repens (Saw palmetto), cernilton (flower pollen), B-sitosterol (e.g. from Pygeum africanum), and pumpkin seed oil. There are several preparations on the market containing a selection of these nutrients and herbs. Prostate surgery has traditionally been seen as offering the most benefits and the most risks for symptomatic BPH but medical and nutritonal treatment has made surgery almost obsolete. BPH is not a sign of prostate cancer. Also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy and nodular hyperplasia of the prostate. Treatment with drugs block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone and lead to elevated levels of estrogen which result in shrinking of the genitalia and low sex drive. Alternative treatments (listed above) do not have such severe side effects. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a noncancerous prostate problem in which the normal elements of the prostate gland grow in size and number. Their sheer bulk may compress the urethra, which courses through the center of the prostate, impeding the flow of urine from the bladder through the urethra to the outside. This leads to urine retention and the need for frequent urination. If BPH is severe, complete blockage can occur. BPH generally begins in a man's 30s, evolves slowly, and causes symptoms only after age 50. BPH is very common. Half of men over age 50 develop symptoms of PBH, but only 10% need medical or surgical intervention. Watchful waiting with annual medical monitoring is appropriate for most men with BPH. Medical therapy includes drugs such as finasteride (Proscar) and terazosin (Hytrin). Nutritional therapy is more effective. The active nutritionals are zinc, copper, flaxseed, sunflower, or safflower oil, vitamin E, Seronoa repens (Saw palmetto), cernilton (flower pollen), B-sitosterol (e.g. from Pygeum africanum), and pumpkin seed oil. There are several preparations on the market containing a selection of these nutrients and herbs. Prostate surgery has traditionally been seen as offering the most benefits and the most risks for symptomatic BPH but medial and nutritonal treatment has made surgery almost obsolete. BPH is not a sign of prostate cancer. Also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy and nodular hyperplasia of the prostate.



The information in this article is not meant to be medical advice.�Treatment for a medical condition should come at the recommendation of your personal physician.

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