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The Hunger Project Bolen Report
Ohm Society
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Sickle Cell Anemia Print E-mail
by Ron Kennedy, M.D., Santa Rosa, CA

Dr. Kennedy Sickle cell anemia is a genetic blood disease due to the presence of an abnormal form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S. Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people throughout the world. It is particularly common among people whose ancestors came from sub-Saharan Africa; Spanish-speaking regions (South America, Cuba, Central America); Saudi Arabia; India; and Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy. In the U.S., sickle cell disease occurs in about 1 in every 500 African-American births and 1 in every 1,000-1,400 Hispanic-American births. Sickle cell anemia is caused by an error in a gene that makes the beta globin chain of hemoglobin. The resultant abnormal hemoglobin (sickle hemoglobin) deforms the red blood cells (into a sickle shape) when they are under low oxygen conditions. Children who inherit 2 copies of the sickle gene, one from each parent, have sickle cell anemia. Children who inherit the sickle gene from only one parent do not have the disease, but will carry the sickle cell trait. Individuals with sickle cell trait generally have no symptoms. About 2 million Americans (or 1 in 12 African-Americans) carry the sickle gene. It does confer a degree of protection from malaria.



The information in this article is not meant to be medical advice.�Treatment for a medical condition should come at the recommendation of your personal physician.

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