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The Hunger Project Bolen Report
Ohm Society
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Skin Cancer Cure Print E-mail

In 1979 Dr. Bill Cham, Ph.D. of Western Australia became interested in a local legend that a plant called Devil's Apple (Solanum linnaeanum) could cure eye cancer in cattle. Over the next many years Dr. Cham managed to isolate the active compounds which turned out to be solasodine rhamnosyl glycosides (solosonine and solamargine). These compounds are most available in the common egg plant. To make a long story short, Dr. Cham has proven beyond any doubt that these compounds cure squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas without surgery. They act by being selectively absorbed by cancer cells (while not affecting normal cells) and inducing the cancer cells to destroy themselves by rupture of an intracellular structure called a lysosome. As the cancer cells die they are replaced by normal cells producing an almost perfect cosmetic result. This product is marketed in cream form and is called "Curaderm BEC5." Twelve weeks of twice daily application produces 100% cure of these two cancers. This is an example of differentiation therapy.

Even more exciting is the possibility that these compounds may turn out to be a cure for all cancers. At least in the test tube they are extremely lethal to cancer cells, much more than any chemotherapy drug on the market. Also, these compounds have almost no toxicity to normal cells - which, of course, is the BIG problem with chemotherapy agents. Apparently, it is only a problem of getting these compounds to the cancer. In skin cancer it is simple - just rub it on. However, it is not yet clear how to bring these compounds into contact with internal cancers. This is undergoing intense research at this time.



The information in this article is not meant to be medical advice.�Treatment for a medical condition should come at the recommendation of your personal physician.

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