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The Hunger Project Bolen Report
Ohm Society
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French Paradox Print E-mail

Dr. Kennedy The "French paradox" is not about how France could had degenerated to its present condition, but rather: 1. The fact that France enjoys a relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease and a relatively long lifespan, despite a diet high in saturated fats. The explanations proposed include the consumption of wine, specifically red wine, alcohol, and resveratrol, an antioxidant in wine, but this is just a cover put forth by the wine industry. Consumption of wine does little to prolong life. 2. The disconnect between France's rich cuisine and slender population. This paradox has been explained in part by portions that are significantly smaller in French restaurants and supermarkets than in their American counterparts. Actually it is simply a circumstance revealing the condition in America which could be termed "Fat Phobia," The "Great Fat Hoax," or "Greast Cholesterol Hoax." Fat has been demonized in the U. S., when in fact it is an important constituent of good nutrition. Consumption of fat reduces hunger and all factors being equal leads to a lower calorie intake. In the U.S. we have glorified carbohydrates while demonizing fat. We consume carbs most commonly in the form of refined grains (breads, pastas, pastries, etc.) and this increases hunger and thus calorie consumption and also increases cholesterol dramatically and predisposes people to the development of diabetes. Also, these kinds of carbs are quickly stored as fat. Nevertheless this entire hoax, or whatever you want to call it, succeeds in selling millions of people copious quantities of drugs they do not need to lower their cholesterol. I live in a country gone mad.



The information in this article is not meant to be medical advice.�Treatment for a medical condition should come at the recommendation of your personal physician.

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